The Play That Goes Wrong in Tampa

When I was in NYC last fall, one of the Broadway shows my husband wanted to see was “The Play that Goes Wrong.” We never made it to that show – and he was excited to see it was going to be right next door this fall at the Straz Center for the Performing Arts in Tampa. In fact, it kicks off their Broadway 2018-19 season this week! Thanks to my relationship with the Tampa Bay Bloggers I was able to receive 2 tickets for us to watch the show in exchange for my honest review.

I read this show would be hilarious. And not just from critics, but from J. J. Abrams. While shooting “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” in London, he went to see “The Play that Goes Wrong” and enjoyed laughing at it so much that he told their creative team he would help bring the show to the USA. He became the producer, and one night on “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert” he surprised the whole audience with tickets to the show – about 400 people walked from the Colbert show through Times Square to this play. 

Note I said play. It is not a musical. It is a silly, funny play. Funny like Jack Tripper on “Three’s Company” tripping over the sofa and falling into a somersault on the living room floor. Kind of slapstick, lots of comedic timing, nothing you need to think too hard about.

The silliness begins from the moment you get your program. Because the show is about a theatre group performing a play (yes, it’s a play within a play) the program reads like their theatre company’s program snuck in the middle of the Straz Center’s program.

You’ll want to arrive early to read some of that, and to see members of the cast doing silly things in the middle of the audience.

The Play that Goes Wrong” has a 1920s whodunit and a love story and tons of goofiness. Everything that could possibly go wrong with a stage production goes wrong. And I mean everything. Things break, people fall, fires start, costumes go inside out, props get mixed up… EVERYTHING!

I recommend sitting back, relaxing, and turning your mind off so you can spend a couple hours just being entertained. Hopefully you’ll LOL and if you’re lucky you’ll ROTFLYFAO. It couldn’t be too bad – after all, it’s the longest-running play currently on Broadway!! (Closing Jan 6, 2019.)

“The Play That Goes Wrong” is in Tampa, Florida, through October 21, 2018. Just six more shows! The Thursday, October 18, 7:30pm performance will be sign language interpreted. Get tickets here.

Also at Straz in the Shimberg Playhouse is “Edgar & Emily.” This much more intense drama features two talented actors on one set for 90 minutes. In the show, Edgar Allan Poe visits Emily Dickinson 15 years or so after his death, and they discuss writing and each others’ neuroses.

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Living with Our Differences

blocksLast Friday I was part of a cool learning experiment. The school I work for brought in an expert who specializing in active block programs in schools. That means “playing blocks.” Did you play with blocks when you were a child? Maybe bright wooden ones that came in a large tub that doubled as a drum, or plastic LEGO-like blocks that could keep an imagination active for hours and a toe sore for days. We also had ABC blocks and Tinkertoys.

The session last week was about implementing a program that allows children to learn from their block play with the right amount of hands-on and hands-off guidance. We talked about what is at eye level in the room with the blocks, and photos of architecture to allow budding minds to expand when building. FIRST we played with blocks. For about 45 minutes our group broke into smaller groups of 2-4 and played with blocks. Most of the attendees taught kindergarten or first grade, and most were female over age 45. (I’m neither a teacher, but I was invited to attend so as to later make a video for parents explaining how blocks are used at the school.)

So there I was paired up with a woman older than me who taught DD2 first grade and a woman younger than me who had at one time been her soccer coach, and is also a kindergarten teacher. Coach wanted to make the Sunshine Skyway Bridge. We were happy to let her idea give us a place to start. First grade teacher started collecting some of the shapes she thought we might need that would run out quickly, and Coach wanted to use Google to find a picture of the Skyway as a reference. Then we got to building.

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I learned a few things in those 45 minutes. I learned the first grade teacher is very competitive. She overhead another group say they were building the Skyway as well, and watching their progress distracted her. I saw Coach emerge as the team lead architect – even though she didn’t care either way, she just wanted to make a bridge. I learned that I say “please” and “excuse me” a lot more than most six year olds playing with blocks do. I also learned it wasn’t PLAY at all. It was strategy and math and efficiency and architecture and physics. There was teamwork and collaboration and imagination and creativity. We were serious about our work, and as it ebbed and flowed we would get close and intense, and later step back and examine. And when we were done, we wanted to take a picture of it. I certainly couldn’t do that when I was six years old!

After 45 minutes we explored the room silently to see what everyone else had built. Then discussion started. People realized how different thought processes and personalities came into play. Who was a good leader and why? Who needed to draw plans before they started, and who just wanted to build and think later… We were mature enough to work well with these different personalities, but that’s a lot harder to do when you are a kindergartener.

My social media has been BLARING with different personalities lately as well – because of the Presidential Election. Those who seek reason, those who mouth off, those who ask for unity and those who repost news stories that were never fact-checked. My Facebook friends have not been mature enough to work well with other personalities.

This leads me to an opportunity for you to get insides someone else’s head.

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time is playing this week at the Straz Center in Tampa, Florida. It is a Tony Award®-winning new play adapted from Mark Haddon’s best-selling novel and directed by Tony winner Marianne Elliott. The lead character is a teenage boy on the autistic spectrum. He is exceptionally intelligent but ill-equipped to interpret everyday life. He does not understand feelings, comedy, metaphors, noise and pretty much anything else that doesn’t follow a logical pattern. He does understand time, math, detective work, and can name every prime number up to 7,057. His parents are trying to seek their own happiness while living with his quirks up close.

Talk about different personalities!

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I have mom-friends who are living like this boy’s mother, unable to hug their child for fear of a tantrum, or ready for the next time chaos ensues due to overstimulation. A close friend of mine who is a single mother to an autistic son once told me, “Nothing about parenting a child with autism will be anything like what you expected.”

And deep down I know parenting any child will not be like what you expected, but caring for my neurotypical daughters was a lot closer to the experience I had babysitting for my neurotypical neighbors, or being a camp counselor each summer to neurotypical 3-6 year olds. My daughters surprise me – coming out of the closet, getting tattoos, getting excited about Calculus 3, joining a kickball team, haircuts, boyfriends, girlfriends, emergency surgery, tantrums at Walt Disney World — but we are mature and loving enough to work well with each other’s personalities.

This play takes you inside the mind of a boy who is not neurotypical. From its very abrupt start, to its grid-like, minimalist set, you’ll be opened up to a new way of thinking — if you allow yourself to be. And I think we all grow and learn from that type of experience.

I recommend seeing this show. I recommend sitting near the stage. I also recommend bringing tissues – because you may laugh and cry your makeup off. Reality and truth aren’t always pretty, but they can smack you in the butt and remind you of what’s really important in life.

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time is playing this week through Nov 13th 2016 at the Straz Center in Tampa, Florida. I was given 2 free tickets to see the show, and as always all opinions are my own.

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